Posts Tagged ‘Pennsylvania’

Postcard exhibit at Lincoln Highway museum

January 2, 2014

LINCOLN HIGHWAY NEWS IS A BLOG BY BRIAN BUTKO
The Lincoln Highway Experience Museum east of Greensburg, Pennsylvania, has launched a new postcard exhibit. “Wish You Were Here” features six greatly-enlarged postcards showing iconic locations along the Lincoln Highway in central and western Pennsylvania.

Trib LH Experience

A screen shot from the Trib Live news story about the postcard exhibit.

The postcard backs are also reproduced, including the personal handwritten messages. All paid visitors to the museum will also receive a free new postcard (and stamp) to write out and address while at the museum.

The museum has an archive with more than 3,000 Lincoln Highway postcards. It is located just west of the Kingston Bridge on US 30 eastbound. The exhibit is located in a room of the historic 1815 Johnston House, one of the oldest structures along the Lincoln Highway.

Read more at
http://triblive.com/neighborhoods/yourligonier/5236930-74/postcard-museum-highway

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New blog following Lincoln Highway westward

June 9, 2013

LINCOLN HIGHWAY NEWS IS A BLOG BY BRIAN BUTKO
Michael E. Grass has started blogging his adventures at “The Lincoln Highway Guide” as he follows the Lincoln Highway westward across the U.S. Grass is a journalist, Web developer, founding co-editor of DCist.com, and founding editor of The Huffington Post’s HuffPostDC.com.

Gas pump sculpture in Chambersburg PA, photo by Michael Grass

In his first post on June 3, Grass wrote, “Thus far, 2013 has brought me to Barbados, Hawaii, Thailand, Malaysia, Los Angeles, New York City, Philadelphia and Portland, Maine. My adventures have been fantastic and they aren’t over yet. This week, I’m setting out to drive the Lincoln Highway all the way to San Francisco.”

And why? “I’m using the Lincoln Highway as a vehicle to rev up my creative engines. The road provides a path for me to explore and create. I plan to write along the way, in real time or near real time, depending on access to wifi or the reliability of my aircard. I hope to live and breathe the open road, which is something that is quintessentially American like apple pie.”

Check it out at lincolnhighwayguide.com/.

Coffee Pot attacks are "tall tales" says AP

November 11, 2011

LINCOLN HIGHWAY NEWS IS A BLOG BY BRIAN BUTKO
The historic Coffee Pot along the Lincoln Highway in Bedford PA has made the news as a possible waste of taxpayer money — but the story is unfounded. Here are a couple news reports.

From Streetsblog:

A handful of Republican Senators really have a knack for rooting out waste in our transportation system — but only the kind of “waste” that is imaginary.

Contrary to claims by Senator John McCain, this giant coffee pot in central Pennsylvania received zero dollars from the Transportation Enhancements program. Despite their claims to fiscal responsibility, Senators Jim Coburn, John McCain and Rand Paul haven’t zeroed in on egregious transportation boondoggles like the $1.7 billion cloverleaf in Wisconsin or the $5.2 billion highway to nowhere outside Houston.

Nope. These “fiscal watchdogs” have taken aim at a $900 million program that provides the majority of the nation’s bike and pedestrian infrastructure. And they’ve used some wild and colorful examples to support their position. Senators Paul and McCain said the Transportation Enhancements program has been used to pay for — no kidding — a “turtle tunnel” and a giant roadside coffee pot.

But this weekend the Associated Press looked into these claims as part of their “Fact Check” feature and found the senators “exaggerated and misrepresented some projects” in their attack. Brent Hugh at the Missouri Bike and Pedestrian Federation breaks down how the AP report should inject some common sense back into the discussion:

The fact check is unusual — every supposedly horrible example of Transportation Enhancements spending is completely debunked. Each example turns out to be either grossly exaggerated or completely misleading. That’s not surprising, because Transportation Enhancements is the single largest source of funding for bicycle and pedestrian funding in the U.S. today, and those projects are important, popular, and much needed.

Also from the AP:

Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., raised the issue last month when he temporarily blocked action on a transportation bill. He said he wanted to allow state transportation departments to use all their federal aid on basic needs such as roads, bridges and tunnels, instead of setting some aside for enhancements.

“We are not pouring asphalt, we are not laying concrete, we are not decreasing congestion, and we are not increasing safety,’’ Coburn complained. He produced a list of 39 projects that he said exemplify extravagance at a time when states don’t have enough money to repair structurally deficient bridges.

Coburn picked his examples from the more than 25,000 projects that have received money since Congress established the enhancement set-aside nearly two decades ago.

First on the list: the Lincoln Highway 200-Mile Roadside Museum in south-central Pennsylvania. It was described as receiving $300,000 in 2004 for signs, murals, colorful vintage gas pumps painted by local artists and refurbishing of a former roadside snack stand from 1927 that’s shaped like a giant coffee pot.

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., was apparently working from Coburn’s list two weeks ago when he offered an amendment to narrow the types of projects eligible for enhancement funds.

“Pennsylvania ranks first out of all states for deficient bridges. Yet it seems to be more important to furbish large roadside coffee pots,’’ McCain said.

But no transportation aid was spent on the coffee pot’s $100,000 restoration, said Olga Herbert, executive director of the Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor. The money was raised entirely from preservation and civic organizations and local supporters.

“We did not use any of this $300,000 award for anything to do with the coffee pot,’’ she said. “It’s interesting that nobody from Senator Coburn’s office called me about this.’’

Calhoun Street route between NJ – PA turns 150

July 14, 2011

LINCOLN HIGHWAY NEWS IS A BLOG BY BRIAN BUTKO
An important link in the Lincoln Highway is examined in an article in the PhillyBurbs.com that also includes this vintage photo (note the Lincoln Highway sign at left).


The first bridge across the Delaware River between Trenton NJ and Morrisville PA opened 150 years ago on July 1, 1861. When the wooden “City Bridge” burned, an iron bridge was built in 60 days by 83 workmen. It opened October 20, 1884, as the Calhoun Street Toll-Supported Bridge but was made toll-free on Nov. 14, 1928. It is now run by the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission, which was formed in 1934 and operates seven toll bridges and 13 toll-supported bridges. A $7.2 million rehabilitation project in 2010 included improvements to the rails and sidewalks, new lighting, blast cleaning, and painting. A vintage iron marker noting the Lincoln Highway state border crossing remains on its downstream side near the Pennsylvania abutment.

Emily & Ron's Lincoln Highway adventures

July 7, 2011

LINCOLN HIGHWAY NEWS IS A BLOG BY BRIAN BUTKO
Roadside and Route 66 enthusiasts Emily Priddy and Ron Warnick recently took a 10-day road trip that Emily chronicled on her Red Fork State of Mind blog. She sent me news updates including that volunteers were stripping the World’s Largest Teapot in Chester, WV, with scrapers, heat guns, and blowtorches as part of an Eagle Scout project.

Above you’ll see they also visited two excellent roadside attractions in east-central PA: the Lincoln Motor Court east of Bedford, and the giant Coffee Pot on the edge of downtown. Then they filled up at Dunkle’s Gulf, a rare art deco gem still in the same family—and still pumping gas!

Emily said their goal was to see Ryne Sandberg managing the Lehigh Valley IronPigs in Allentown, so she and Ron (who pens the Route 66 News blog, which inspired this one!) headed east on the Lincoln Highway:

I fell in love with the farmland of Iowa; the vibrant energy of Chicago; the charming downtowns of Goshen, Ind., and Van Wert, Ohio; the giant teapot in Chester, W. Va.; the winding mountain roads of rural Pennsylvania; and the ethnic neighborhoods and skinny townhouses with old men killing time on their front stoops in the narrow side streets of Allentown.

To follow their trip, start at redforkhippie.wordpress.com/2011/06/28/go-the-distance then use the calendar to keep following, or just go to redforkhippie.wordpress.com and read up from the bottom!

Extra Lane to aid turns at Lincoln Heights PA

March 21, 2011

LINCOLN HIGHWAY NEWS IS A BLOG BY BRIAN BUTKO
A road project in western Pennsylvania will widen eastbound and westbound lanes along the Lincoln Highway/U.S. Route 30 to create a turning lane. The Tribune Review reports that “a 1-1/2-mile stretch in Hempfield to create a center turning lane is on schedule, with the opening of construction bids in November or December…. The project, which is estimated to cost between $7 million and $12 million, has been targeted since the early 1990s, but has funding available from state and federal sources to move forward.”

The project design covers an area near Walton Tea Room Road, just west of the Toll Route 66 interchange, through Lincoln Heights to the Route 30 intersection with Possum Hollow Road and West Penn Drive, near a West Penn Power building and Sacred Heart Cemetery.

Mister Ed's Elephant Museum rebuilt, reopens!

February 7, 2011

LINCOLN HIGHWAY NEWS IS A BLOG BY BRIAN BUTKO
The York Dispatch ran a nice story (and the photo below) about the reopening of Mister Ed’s Elephant Museum, a popular Lincoln Highway roadside attractions west of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Seven months after arson destroyed Ed Gotwalt’s business, the museum opened Saturday. State police have no suspects for the blaze that destroyed the museum and its 10,000-piece elephant collection. “I’m very blessed,” Gotwalt said. “I’m very excited. I want to share this with the world.”

The new museum features two elephant sculptures made from salvaged pieces of the destroyed elephant souvenirs. You can visit at 6019 Chambersburg Road/U.S. 30 in Orrtanna, between Chambersburg and Gettysburg, from 10 am – 5 pm daily; admission is FREE. Contributions made to the Tammy Lee Cullison Save the Animal Fund, in memory of Gotwalt’s daughter, will be given to the SPCA in Gettysburg and Chambersburg and an animal sanctuary in Tennessee.

Route 30 movie sequel filming in PA

December 1, 2010

LINCOLN HIGHWAY NEWS IS A BLOG BY BRIAN BUTKO
The Gettysburg Times reports that filming has begun on the second of three movies in John Putch’s Route 30 trilogy.

The first day of filming for a 19-day shoot of “Route 30, Too!” occurred in the Caledonia area, along the famous Lincoln Highway, according to director John Putch.

Other local scenes for the film are scheduled in Chambersburg, Mister Ed’s Elephant Museum in Orrtanna, the historic Round Barn, and the Totem Pole Playhouse.

“It’s three stories intertwined into one,” Putch said regarding the new film, unlike the original movie “Route 30,” which featured “three different stories” in 2008.

Putch, the son of famous actress Jean Stapleton and William H. Putch, an original member of the Totem Pole Playhouse, is an actor, producer, writer and director. He has appeared in an episode of “Seinfeld,” “Jaws 3” and various other roles as well as directed episodes of “Scrubs,” “Grounded for Life,” and “Ugly Betty.” His own film credits include “Mojave Phone Booth” (2006), “Bachelorman” (2003), “Pursuit of Happiness” (2001) and “Valerie Flake” (1999).

Since its release, Putch has travelled the country showing “Route 30” at various film festivals and to date the film has won 14 awards.

LHHC gets grant for iPhone Lincoln Highway app

October 28, 2010

LINCOLN HIGHWAY NEWS IS A BLOG BY BRIAN BUTKO
The state has awarded $500,000 for recreation projects in Franklin and Cumberland counties in Pennsylvania, one of which will be an iPhone application to promote the Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor. According to the Chambersburg Public Opinion, “the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources invested $23 million in 189 conservation and recreation projects in 65 counties. Another 177 applications were not funded. A grant of $180,000 will be used to develop an iPhone application to promote tourism in the Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor and to finance a variety of other Lincoln Highway programs — mini-grants, school programs and repair interpretive exhibits and signs. The state’s National Road Heritage Corridor is also developing an iPhone application.

Affair with Lincoln benefits Heritage Corridor

October 15, 2010

LINCOLN HIGHWAY NEWS IS A BLOG BY BRIAN BUTKO
Limited tickets are available for An Affair with Lincoln, a gala on November 6, 2010. The event, to benefit the Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor in PA, will be held at the Winnie Palmer Nature Reserve located in Latrobe. Enjoy hors d’oeuvres, desserts, and signature drinks while mingling with en plein air artists Kevin Kutz, Rita Haldeman, Bill Pfahl, Bill Vrscak, Ron Donoughe, and Robert Bowden.

The mission of the Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor is to identify, conserve, promote and interpret the cultural, historical, natural, recreational, and economic resources along the Lincoln Highway in Westmoreland, Somerset, Bedford, Fulton, Franklin and Adams counties. Established 15 years ago, the Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor was recently recognized by the governor with induction into the Keystone Society for Tourism and received the celebrated Enterprise Award as a “visionary in destination leadership and community development.”

Visit http://www.lhhc.org for a PDF invitation and to purchase tickets.